Tracey Jackson

Mar 2 2014 | 2 Comments

TWO RED BEDS

L1080958 her bedrom

 

On our last day in Mexico City we visited  two private homes that have been turned into museums.  They could not be anymore different. One, the home of a spoiled, rich heiress who loved art, and dogs and Mexico and built herself a museum. Not unlike Carlos Slim, only better. And the other was a man who was one of the father’s of the Russian Revolution. The only thing they had in common is they were both “involved” with Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera.

The first home/museum was owned by a woman called Dolores Olmedo Patino.  The museum sits on acres of verdant land a short distance out of town.

It’s a grand hacienda that houses what is purported to be the best collection  of Diego Rivera’s and Frida Kahlos in the world.  Apparently Dolores was a lover of Diego’s. She was a great patron of the arts in general, and from the looks of the walls we saw, she was a primary narcissist as well.

I have never seen so many portraits of one person in their home, in my life.  She did live to be 100 so she had plenty of  years for photo ops.

I say she is “purported to have the best collection” because just like the Jumex, the museum was closed. At least the part of the museum that houses the Riveras and Kahlos was shuttered when we got there.

I jokingly said to Glenn, “They must be going over to the Jumex.”

Which it turns out they sort of were. The museum was closed because they are getting ready to put on the ritz when the New York Artistas arrive en masse for the official Jumex opening.

So we saw a few rooms of the house. No photos allowed. I snuck two.

We got to spend time with her peacocks and wander a bit around the gardens.

It was fine. When you are travelling nothing is a waste.

Then we headed over to the Museo Casa Trotsky.

A few blocks away from the Frida Kahlo house is the house where  Trotsky spent  his final years.  He and Frida had an affair, apparently he and Diego had a few fights, so he decided to decamp a few streets away.

This is the house where he was ice picked to death in 1940.

It is not the “typical” Mexico City experience but it was one of the more stirring things we saw.  And everything was there, nothing had gone to Jumex and it was open!

 

My camera was on some weird setting, so it's fuzzy, but this is the main door.

My camera was on some weird setting, so it’s fuzzy, but this is the main door.

Part of the property.

Part of the property.

 

 

Now we may not have gotten to see the art works, but the place is crawling with peacocks.

Now we may not have gotten to see the art works, but the place is crawling with peacocks.

 

So I decided to take as many photos of them as I could.

So I decided to take as many photos of them as I could.

Different angles.

Different angles.

He was ready for his close up.

He was ready for his close up.

 

There is one hiding behind the statue of Diego Rivera.

There is one hiding behind the statue of Diego Rivera.

There was another one hiding in the window of a building.

There was another one hiding in the window of a building. They were everywhere.

 

 

Dolores raised the very rare ancient, hairless, Mexican dogs known as Xoloitzcuintle.  Can you tell which are real and which is the statue?

Dolores raised the very rare ancient, hairless, Mexican dogs known as Xoloitzcuintle. Can you tell which are real and which is the statue?

 

Glenn and Riccardo going into the main house.

Glenn and Riccardo going into the main house.

The bedroom was the only room without these intrusive women wandering about glaring at you.

The bedroom was the only room without these intrusive women wandering about glaring at you.

Dolores being painted by Diego Rivera.  Taken from the web.

Dolores being painted by Diego Rivera.
Taken from the web.

Part of the museum we didn't see.

Part of the museum we didn’t see.

Museo Trotsky.

Museo Casa Trotsky.

One of the first things you see. There are rooms devoted to his books, where people can come study his teachings. There are also rooms with photos and his entire history.

One of the first things you see. There are rooms devoted to his books, where people can come study his teachings. There are also rooms with photos and his entire history.

 

Back away from the books Glenn.

Back away from the books Glenn.

 

Trotsky's Last House.

Trotsky’s Last House.

 

The garden.

The garden.

 

Kind of cool - these were Trotsky's clothes.

Kind of cool – these were Trotsky’s clothes.

 

And his bathroom.

And his bathroom.

His desk.

His desk.

The dictophone he used.

The dictophone he used.

The office for his staff.

The office for his staff.

Kitchen.

Kitchen.

 

The bed he was killed in.

The bed he was killed in.

 

Where Trotsky and his wife are buried.

Where Trotsky and his wife are buried.

 

 

  • Steppie Royes

    Love the peacocks. Have some recent pictures of the ones at the zoo in similar pose. Always a beautiful experience. Love the room of books. It’s a life goal of mine to have a personal library just as big, if not bigger. Death by ice pick? I hope it was a quick death. Glad you made it home safely! :’)

  • http://www.traceyjacksononline.com/ Tracey Jackson

    Oh Steppie, how funny, as I saw you posted a photo of the peacocks at the zoo the same day. I guess great minds take pictures of peacocks!!!!!